Learn HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS in Mozilla

Creativity | 2010.12.18 22:33 | Posted by 스마트 안전보건
"www.amplify.com"

 

Mozilla is getting ready for the January semester of School of Webcraft

a 100% free developer training resource run in partnership with

Peer 2 Peer University

 

Last semester, the School of Webcraft offered 15 classes; now,

Mozilla is trying to get around 30 classes going for the January semester.

 

Classes will be between six and 10 weeks long; they’ll revolve around

topics relevant to web designers and developers, including HTML5,

JavaScript and CSS. Previous classes have also included non-developer

topics such as organic SEO. Requisite skill levels will run the gamut from

novice to expert. The volunteer-run courses will begin on January 26,

and proposals for new course ideas are still being accepted.

 

Students learn through a combination of free and open learning materials,

online study groups and hands-on assignments that test their hacking skills.

 

If you’re a leader in the developer community, you can also step up and

lead a course yourself. If you want to organize a class, you’ll get support

from P2PU and Mozilla in the form of course design, materials, learning

facilitation and other resources.

 

Registration opens on January 8; until then, you can sign up for the School

of Webcraft e-mail list.

 

Mozilla believes that developer training is “both at the high school and

university level… out of date, lousy and losing students.” Another problem

is that younger learners simply don’t have access to good web dev learning

resources. And certification training is expensive and often out of step with

current practices

 

By creating a completely free, open training ground for developers and

would-be developers of all stripes, Mozilla hopes to remedy some of the

problems surrounding technology education.

 

We fully support this mission; anything that will allow more people to become

better informed about and more proficient in web development and related

technologies is a win in our book.

 

Of course, we’d love to see more than just front-end and markup languages

explored; but for that to happen, some knowledgeable devs are going to

have to volunteer to teach their peers the basics (or not-so-basics) of

other programming languages.

 

"Retrieved from http://mashable.com

 

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Learn HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS in Mozilla

Creativity | 2010.12.18 22:33 | Posted by 스마트 안전보건
"www.amplify.com"

 

Mozilla is getting ready for the January semester of School of Webcraft

a 100% free developer training resource run in partnership with

Peer 2 Peer University

 

Last semester, the School of Webcraft offered 15 classes; now,

Mozilla is trying to get around 30 classes going for the January semester.

 

Classes will be between six and 10 weeks long; they’ll revolve around

topics relevant to web designers and developers, including HTML5,

JavaScript and CSS. Previous classes have also included non-developer

topics such as organic SEO. Requisite skill levels will run the gamut from

novice to expert. The volunteer-run courses will begin on January 26,

and proposals for new course ideas are still being accepted.

 

Students learn through a combination of free and open learning materials,

online study groups and hands-on assignments that test their hacking skills.

 

If you’re a leader in the developer community, you can also step up and

lead a course yourself. If you want to organize a class, you’ll get support

from P2PU and Mozilla in the form of course design, materials, learning

facilitation and other resources.

 

Registration opens on January 8; until then, you can sign up for the School

of Webcraft e-mail list.

 

Mozilla believes that developer training is “both at the high school and

university level… out of date, lousy and losing students.” Another problem

is that younger learners simply don’t have access to good web dev learning

resources. And certification training is expensive and often out of step with

current practices

 

By creating a completely free, open training ground for developers and

would-be developers of all stripes, Mozilla hopes to remedy some of the

problems surrounding technology education.

 

We fully support this mission; anything that will allow more people to become

better informed about and more proficient in web development and related

technologies is a win in our book.

 

Of course, we’d love to see more than just front-end and markup languages

explored; but for that to happen, some knowledgeable devs are going to

have to volunteer to teach their peers the basics (or not-so-basics) of

other programming languages.

 

"Retrieved from http://mashable.com

 

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5 design trends in 2011

Creativity | 2010.11.23 06:23 | Posted by 스마트 안전보건

This post originally appeared on the American Express OPEN Forum, where Mashable

regularly contributes articles about leveraging social media and technology in small business.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the past 12 months, we’ve seen a lot of changes in the world of web design. Growing popularity in the mobile device space — including smartphones and tablets like the iPad — have refined the way many users access and interact with content.

 

Likewise, the formal adoption of web standards like HTML5, web fonts and CSS3 by browser makers means that more and more users are now able to take advantage of the latest and greatest features on the web.

1. Lose the Flash

Regardless of where you stand in the war over Flash, the fact remains that more and more sites and web developers are moving away from Flash-only solutions for video, animation and navigation.

Flash still excels when it comes to building fully interactive designs and Rich Interactive Applications (RIAs), but for small business owners who aren’t showcasing or providing that sort of experience, trading Flash for HTML5, JavaScript and CSS3 might just make more sense.

2. Web Fonts

Typography is an important — I would argue crucial — component of any web design. Historically, customizing the typography you use on a website has been a complicated and headache-inducing process. As a result, most designers were reduced to either using the small selection of web-safe fonts or using workarounds like text images or Flash as text replacements.

3. Mobile Compatible/Optimized Sites

More and more websites — big and small — are taking the time to make their sites small screen friendly. Having a mobile compatible or mobile optimized website means that not only will your site load faster over cellular data connections but that content will be better formatted for the screens of smaller devices, making it easier to access and understand.

4. Inspired By Tumblr

The popular microblogging platform Tumblr (Tumblr) is a great way to quickly and easily post updates, share content and garner direct visitor feedback. Tumblr has become a really popular platform and more and more small businesses are using it for their own company blogs or sites.

5. Touches of the Future: HTML5 and CSS3

As I stated in the introduction, it can be difficult for small businesses that aren’t in a design-related field to adopt many of the cutting-edge web design trends for fear of shutting out parts of their potential audience.

Read more at mashable.com

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